US Box Office – 4 July 1979

1 NE 1 MOONRAKER Roger Moore, Lois Chiles
2 4 6 ALIEN Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt
3 1 3 ROCKY II Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire
4 2 2 THE MAIN EVENT Barbra Streisand, Ryan O’Neal
5 3 2 ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ Clint Eastwood, Patrick McGoohan
6 5 3 PROPHECY Talia Shire, Robert Foxworth
7 6 3 THE IN-LAWS Peter Falk, Alan Arkin
8 NE 1 NIGHTWING Nick Mancuso, David Warner
9 NE 1 BLOODLINE Audrey Hepburn, Ben Gazzara
10 RE 56 GOOD GUYS WEAR BLACK Chuck Norris, Anne Archer

Complete US Box Office Charts (week-by-week)
from Variety magazine are available here:
https://www.amazon.com/Weekly-Box-Office-Charts-1970s-ebook/dp/B071GPPSGR/

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US Box Office – 25 December 1974

1 7 2 THE GODFATHER PART II Al Pacino, Robert De Niro
2 NE 1 THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN Roger Moore, Christopher Lee
3 NE 1 THE TOWERING INFERNO Paul Newman, Steve McQueen
4 NE 1 THE ISLAND AT THE TOP OF THE WORLD David Hartman, Donald Sinden
5 NE 1 THE FRONT PAGE Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau
6 10 10 AIRPORT 1975 Charlton Heston, Karen Black
7 2 6 EARTHQUAKE Charlton Heston, Ava Gardner
8 1 22 DEATH WISH Charles Bronson, Hope Lange
9 3 7 THE LITTLE PRINCE Steven Warner, Joss Ackland
10 6 6 LENNY Dustin Hoffman, Valerie Perrine

Complete US Box Office Charts (week-by-week)
from Variety magazine are available here:
https://www.amazon.com/Weekly-Box-Office-Charts-1970s-ebook/dp/B071GPPSGR/

US Box Office – 4 July 1973

1 NE 1 LIVE AND LET DIE Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto
2 1 10 SCARECROW Gene Hackman, Al Pacino
3 NE 1 THE MAN WHO LOVED CAT DANCING Burt Reynolds, Sarah Miles
4 NE 2 SHAFT IN AFRICA Richard Roundtree, Frank Finlay
5 NE 1 40 CARATS Liv Ullmann, Edward Albert
6 3 28 THE HEARTBREAK KID Charles Grodin, Cybill Shepherd
7 6 6 PAPER MOON Ryan O’Neal, Tatum O’Neal
8 RE 16 THE MACK Max Julien, Don Gordon
9 4 16 TOM SAWYER Johnny Whitaker, Celeste Holm
10 NE 1 JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR Ted Neeley, Carl Anderson

Complete US Box Office Charts (week-by-week)
from Variety magazine are available here:
https://www.amazon.com/Weekly-Box-Office-Charts-1970s-ebook/dp/B071GPPSGR/

James Bond Films 1962 – 2015

Note: “Dr. No” and “From Russia With Love” were released in 1962 and 1963 respectively, in the United Kingdom. The dates on the list below are for the US releases only.

Year Film – Actors Rank Wks Adjusted Gross Annual Rank
1963 DR. NO Sean Connery, Ursula Andress 4 $109,970,000 44
1964 FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE Sean Connery, Daniela Bianchi 3 $169,000,000 15
1964 GOLDFINGER Sean Connery, Gert Fröbe 1 7 $411,960,000 3
1965 THUNDERBALL Sean Connery, Claudine Auger 1 9 $477,480,000 3
1967 YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE Sean Connery, Akiko Wakabayashi 1 6 $273,130,000 7
1969 ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SERVICE George Lazenby, Diana Rigg 1 4 $111,080,000 11
1971 DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER Sean Connery, Jill St. John 1 7 $206,830,000 3
1973 LIVE AND LET DIE Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto 1 5 $155,650,000 9
1974 THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN Roger Moore, Christopher Lee 2 $87,340,000 27
1977 THE SPY WHO LOVED ME Roger Moore, Barbara Bach 2 $189,020,000 7
1979 MOONRAKER Roger Moore, Lois Chiles 1 4 $233,820,000 9
1981 FOR YOUR EYES ONLY Roger Moore, Carole Bouquet 3 $170,550,600 8
1983 OCTOPUSSY Roger Moore, Maud Adams 2 $186,438,000 6
1985 A VIEW TO A KILL Roger Moore, Christopher Walken 2 $122,630,100 13
1987 THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS Timothy Dalton, Maryam d’Abo 1 2 $113,237,300 19
1989 LICENSE TO KILL Timothy Dalton, Robert Davi 4 $75,533,900 36
1995 GOLDENEYE Pierce Brosnan, Sean Bean 1 1 $211,094,100 6
1997 TOMORROW NEVER DIES Pierce Brosnan, Jonathan Pryce 2 $232,781,700 10
1999 THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH Pierce Brosnan, Sophie Marceau 1 1 $214,985,400 14
2002 DIE ANOTHER DAY Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry 1 2 $238,601,900 12
2006 CASINO ROYALE Daniel Craig, Eva Green 2 $219,958,100 9
2008 QUANTUM OF SOLACE Daniel Craig, Olga Kurylenko 1 1 $202,839,400 9
2012 SKYFALL Daniel Craig, Javier Bardem 1 2 $327,333,300 4
2015 SPECTRE Daniel Craig, Christoph Waltz 1 2 $200,074,609 10
Un-Official Films:
1967 CASINO ROYALE David Niven, Peter Sellers 1 6 $147,050,000 12
1983 NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN Sean Connery, Kim Basinger 1 4 $152,220,300 14

Top James Bond Actors 1962 – 2015

Rank Actor Average Gross Films Total Adjusted Grosses
1 Sean Connery $274,728,000 6 $1,648,370,000
2 Daniel Craig $237,551,000 4 $950,205,000
3 Pierce Brosnan $224,365,000 4 $897,463,000
4 Roger Moore $163,635,000 7 $1,145,448,000
5 George Lazenby $111,080,000 1 $111,080,000
6 Timothy Dalton $94,385,600 2 $188,771,000

Roger Moore: “Sean Connery and I discussed how our production companies were trying to kill us”

Sir Roger Moore, who shot to fame after playing James Bond across seven films, died on May 23 at age 89 following a brief battle with cancer. Back in 2012, as Skyfall (with Daniel Craig playing Bond) dominated the box office, Moore spoke to Entertainment Weekly about his time playing Bond in the ’70s and ’80s, stories he recounted in the memoir Bond on Bond.

How did you come to write Bond On Bond?
Well, so, you pick up a pen…[Chuckles] No, the publishers of the last book I did, My Word Is My Bond, thought that it would be rather good timing to do it at the same time as the 50th anniversary celebration [and of] the new Bond. And I’m delighted that it’s the same time as not only the new Bond but the best Bond.

You write in the book that you met Bond movie producers Harry Saltzman and Cubby Broccoli while gambling in a London casino. That’s very James Bond-ian. What was your game of choice?
Well, then we played chemin de fer. My game of choice was craps. I love rolling dice. But I was very unwise to do all that gambling. It was expensive. But I learned my lesson.

You also recall that you were asked to get your hair cut to play Bond. Were you indulging your inner hippie-child at the time?
No. I’d finished 13 and a half months of doing the Persuaders series with Tony Curtis. The character I played, I let his hair get longer and longer. Those were the days when I had enough hair for it to be wavy and grow long. We also indulged in quite a lot of champagne on the set of Persuaders so I gained a little weight.

When I got around to doing Bond they did think that my hair was a little long and that I was a little overweight. So I started working out like bloody mad and starving and getting my hair cut. I finished up saying, “Couldn’t you get a thin, bald man to start with?”

The Man With the Golden Gun may be my favorite Bond film. What was Christopher Lee like to work with?
Oh, Christopher’s lovely. I met him first in 1948. I’d just come out of the army with 30 other hopeful young actors playing stage-door Johnnies in a film called Trottie True. I remember Christopher looking down his nose at me and saying, “If you’d been in the forces with me, you would have stood to attention whenever you spoke to me!” There was another friend of mine, who’d been in the army with me, who said, “Shall I nobble him?” I said, “No need.”

On the set of The Man With the Golden Gun you teased him about the fact that he was famous for playing Dracula?
Yeah. [Laughs] As we walked into the cave in Pei Pei Island all these bats came flying out, and without hesitating, he put up his hand and he said, “Not now!” He looked down at me and said, “You’ll use that against me, won’t you?” “Yes!” In the book, I said that he looked down at me rather sheepishly. He was furious about this. He called my assistant at Pinewood and said, “I have never looked ‘sheepish’ in my life! I looked at him coldly!”

What about Hervé Villechaize?
Herve was a strange, strange man. He was rather oversexed.

I didn’t realize that was possible. But, moving on! A View to a Kill found you working with both Christopher Walken and Grace Jones. It’s kind of hard for me to imagine the three of you on a set together.
I had a very good time with Chris Walken. Very nice fellow. In fact, he and his wife came and stayed with me one Christmas in Gstaad in Switzerland. I wouldn’t give that pleasure to Grace Jones.

Would you care to elaborate on that?
No. If you can’t say something nice about somebody, don’t say anything.

I had no idea that, while you were shooting Octopussy, you would have dinner with Sean Connery, who was shooting the rival Bond production Never Say Never Again at the same time.
Yeah. Sean and I had dinner and we’d discuss how our various production companies were trying to kill us.

Did you keep any mementos from your time as Bond? What about the fake third nipple you wore to impersonate Lee’s Scaramanga?
[Laughs] No. I don’t know what happened to those. I think Christopher took those home with him! A lot of clothes I stole. Not stole. Cubby would say, “Take what you want,” which I did. I tried to get the carpets out of the dressing room but they were stuck down too well.

Do you have any projects coming up?
Most of my time these days is spent with UNICEF, raising awareness and raising funds. My oldest [son] Geoffrey is connected with The Saint (the ’60s TV show version of which starred Moore) and it’s quite possible that might get going before Christmas, as a [new] TV series.

What would your involvement be with that?
My involvement would be to sit back and wish them every success and maybe wander through as some odd character.

Outside of Bond, could I ask you tell one story about Lee Marvin [who appeared with Moore in 1976’s Shout at the Devil]?
Lee? He was a great, great, great man. Funny. Funny as hell. Controlled his drinking [pauses] up to a point. When he would go on a blinder, his eyes remained blue but his breath reeked of vodka.

When we were shooting in South Africa, we were in this odd location in the middle of the jungle and the house we’d built was where [my character] had fathered a child with his daughter. I don’t know how people do it — they let their few-weeks-old babies be filmed. But, anyway, we had this little three-week-old baby that was supposed to be ours. Lee lurched towards the child and picked it up in his arms and, oh my god, it was screaming. I was so worried — the baby’s head was flopping — that Lee would drop it. But then the baby stopped crying and seemed to sleep peacefully. What it was, he’d taken a deep breath of Lee Marvin’s alcohol-soaked breath — and gone straight off!

By Clark Collis (Entertainment Weekly)